Duplicate Solicitation Letters

I’ve heard a lot of recommendations for nonprofits to rehash their old and current website content on their blog and through their social channels. This is a great way to find some information you can use to publish, but make sure to take a strategic look at your communications. Every organization has donors who are receiving more than one kind of update from the organization. There is a significant amount of overlap between donors who receive solicitation letters, and donors who become fans of your Facebook Page. (In fact, you should let your donors know that you have a social media presence and how they can sign-up.)

When you run a solicitation campaign, using multiple mediums can be a great technique to be successful. But, do not send the exact same information in the exact same format to each group of donors. Don’t send your solicitation letter at the same time as you send your Facebook update and email announcements.

Think through each touch point with your donors and use them to your advantage. If all of your communications happen in one day, then they can feel overwhelmed, like you spent too much time and money on them. If you send off a letter, and a week later follow it up with an email, then the email acts as a reminder. Often, people take one or two reminders before they follow through with what you’d like them to do. Make each communication a little bit different but with a unified message. No one wants to read the exact same words every time. Use your mail campaigns to go into more detail, and use your email to catch their interest and point them to your website or previous letter for more information.

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2 Responses to Duplicate Solicitation Letters

  1. […] what you already know? Do you find that annoying or helpful? Do you find it duplicative (like this article from the A Small Change blog discusses), finding the same information in the same […]

  2. […] what you already know? Do you find that annoying or helpful? Do you find it duplicative (like this article from the A Small Change blog discusses), finding the same information in the same […]

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