Current Trends & The Ask: Capital Campaign Interview

I hope that you enjoyed this week’s posts, Key Components and Campaign Strategy. Other topics that are coming this week are including an online strategy, and third party help. I want this week’s posts to be used and available to as many people in the nonprofit world as possible. Please send this link to a friend, stumble this post, or simply take a minute to leave some feedback. Today I am asking about current trends and determining the amount for a capital ask.

What are some new and developing campaign trends?

The Collins Group:

  • More organizations are creating comprehensive campaigns that bring together annual, capital, and endowment fundraising goals for a specific period of time
  • We are seeing an increase in planning for endowment campaigns, particularly in sectors such as arts and culture that have capitalized over the past decade
  • The community college sector is expanding its fundraising power with more and more colleges moving into their first-ever privately funded building and/or endowment campaign
  • More donors are giving “tester” gifts early in a campaign and following up with additional gifts as a campaign progresses. This makes donor stewardship during a campaign more important than ever

Dana Van Nest, Marketing Director and Kate Roosevelt, CFRE, Vice President, www.collinsgroup.com

Lipman Hearne:
As the economic disparities in our society have increased, the old 80/20 rule has become 90/10 or higher. And, campaigns continue to get bigger and the “breathing space” between them is typically reduced. It’s not unusual for us to talk about how to wrap up a current, successful campaign and how to launch the next one – all during the course of a single meeting.
Robert Moore, Managing Partner, www.lipmanhearne.com

How do you determine the ask amount for a capital ask?

The Collins Group:
As a starting place, your organization should research the prospect’s giving history to your organization and to others, assess their level of commitment to your mission, and identify their giving capacity (e.g. professional history, assets, family history). It is most effective to have peers of the prospect involved in both establishing a respectful ask amount and soliciting the gift. Asking for a multi-year pledge can also help a donor see a way to “stretch” their giving.
Dana Van Nest, Marketing Director and Kate Roosevelt, CFRE, Vice President, www.collinsgroup.com

Lipman Hearne:
Through the feasibility study process, ongoing conversations, prospect rating systems, and an examination of public data regarding the prospect’s financial status. One of the old truisms of fundraising is that “nobody is offended by being asked for too much” – the assumption being that the prospect says to himself or herself, “they must think I’m doing really well.” Overshooting the mark by a ridiculous amount, though, would cause a prospect to think that you haven’t really done your homework or preparation very well.
Robert Moore, Managing Partner, www.lipmanhearne.com

Please leave any comments or advice of your own below. If you would like to see past and upcoming online interviews you can visit the Interviews page. Thanks for reading!

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2 Responses to Current Trends & The Ask: Capital Campaign Interview

  1. […] hope that you enjoyed this week’s posts, Key Components, Campaign Strategy, Current Trends & The Ask, and Online Strategy. I want to say a big thank you again to The Collins Group, Lipman Hearne, and […]

  2. […] hope that you enjoyed this week’s posts, Key Components, Campaign Strategy, and Current Trends & The Ask. Our final topic for tomorrow is third party help. I want this week’s posts to be used and […]

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